Free Screening of Native Landscaping Documentary Hometown Habitat in Springfield, MO November 21 

“Hometown Habitat, Stories of Bringing Nature Home” showcases how homeowners and communities nationwide are landscaping with native plants, creating havens for pollinators, songbirds, and other cherished wildlife. 

 

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Free screening of the film Hometown Habitat, Stories of Bringing Nature Home Date and time: Thursday, November 21, 2019 Doors open at 6:00 p.m. The film will be screened from 6:30 to 9:00 p.m.
Location: The auditorium at the Springfield Conservation Nature Center, 4601 S. Nature Center Way, Springfield, MO 65804
This is a free event, but registration is required: Call 417-888-4237 to register.

Jefferson City, MO (October 22, 2019)—Residents throughout Springfield and beyond are welcome to a free screening of the film Hometown Habitat, Stories of Bringing Nature Home, 6:00 – 9:00 pm, Thursday, Nov. 21, 2019 at the Springfield Conservation Nature Center to learn about inspiring native landscaping projects in communities to support pollinators and wildlife, beautify cities, protect water quality, and provide other benefits. 

The film will be followed by a question and answer session with a panel of local experts knowledgeable about native landscaping, including Ronda Burnett with the Missouri Department of Conservation and a member of the Missouri Prairie Foundation’s Grow Native! committee; Barbara Lucks, Chair of the Environmental Collaborative of the Community Partnership of the Ozarks; Carrie Lamb with the City of Springfield, and Brian Edmond, Missouri Prairie Foundation board member. 

A local Bringing Nature Home Story Springfield resident Barbara Kipfer remembers a decisive moment about her property four years ago: “I realized that my yard was an empty buffet table for insects and birds. I especially loved butterflies, and I had no food sources for them.” 

That’s when Barbara and her husband, Bob Kipfer, decided to landscape with native plants in their yard. They planted milkweed, whose leaves are the only food source for the caterpillars of monarch butterflies. They planted golden current and admired eight different kinds of pollinating insects gathering nectar and pollen from the yellow blossoms of this native shrub—while the yellow flowers of a nearby non-native forsythia in their yard had no bees at all. “That was a ‘wow’ moment for us,” remembers Bob. 

The Kipfers are not the only homeowners dedicated to making their property a “smorgasbord” of native plant food to support the web of life. The interest in native landscaping is growing nationwide, and for good reason: native plants are the basis of the food chain for native insects, many of which pollinate wild plants and food crops, and which are also vital food for birds and other wildlife. Plants native to Missouri are also adapted to our local weather conditions, soils, and rainfall. Many are drought tolerant and after establishment require little watering. Learn about other inspiring native landscaping stories—such as what the Kipfers have done in their own yard—at the Hometown Habitat, Stories of Bringing Nature Home film screening on November 21. Bring your native landscaping questions for the panelists to address. 

This screening is presented by the Missouri Prairie Foundation’s Grow Native! program, and sponsored by the City of Springfield’s Yard Ethic Program, the Community Partnership of the Ozarks’ Environmental Collaborative, Ozarks Environment News, and the Missouri Department of Conservation