Apr 1

April 1, 2017: Grow Native! Workshop and Plant Sale in Kirksville

MDC Northeast Regional Office
3500 S Baltimore St
Kirksville MO, 63501
9am - 3pm

Native Plants in Gardens & Landscapes: Hardy Plants Helping Pollinators

Join us at the Missouri Department of Conservation Northeast Regional Office in Kirksville, Missouri on April 1, 2017 for our Grow Native! workshop and plant sale!

Cost: $30 for Grow Native! and Missouri Prairie Foundation members, $40 for non-members, $20 for students. Includes a light breakfast and lunch.

Register online or download the registration form in PDF format to pay by check.
2 CEUs available for Landscape Architects.

Agenda: Saturday, April 1, 2017
9:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m.

9:00 a.m. – Registration, light breakfast and coffee, view exhibits

9:30 a.m. – Welcome and introductions

9:45 a.m. – Ed Spevak: Native Pollinators: Who are they? Why should we care? How can we help?

  • Discover the diversity of pollinators found in our area especially the native bees, understand their importance to us and nature and how we can help in their survival in our own front yards, backyards and fields.

10:45 a.m. – Break, view exhibits

11:00 a.m. – Bruce Schuette: Midwestern Native Small Trees and Large Shrubs

  • Our native small trees and large shrubs are icons of the native landscaping movement since its beginning with Jens Jensen (prairie crabapple inspired his interest in native plants).  Learn the beauty and ecological benefits of these important components of a successful landscape.

12:00 p.m. – Lunch

1:00 p.m. – 

  • Dan Getman: Become a Citizen Scientist and Contribute to the Monarch Recovery Effort
    • Most of us would recognize the monarch butterfly, with its iconic orange and black coloring, flying alongside a road or landing on a flower to feed on nectar. But monarch numbers have declined by nearly 90% over the last 20 years and some think they should be listed as an “endangered species.” This talk will focus on 5 simple things you can do to support the monarch’s recovery, including opportunities for each of us to become a “Citizen Scientist.” “Citizen science” is a term used for data that is collected by the general public, under guidance from experienced researchers, that is entered into a database and then analyzed by those researchers. It provides a unique opportunity to collect a large amount of data in the field.
  • Claire Peckosh: Germination and Propagation of Native Seeds
    • Preparing seed; soil, light, and heat requirements for germination; transplanting procedures
  • John Murphy: Native Plants in the Landscape—on Your Acreage or Farm
    • Native plants have wide-ranging benefits for the environment, from water management and wildlife habitat, to the production of healthy soils.

1:45 p.m. – Break, view exhibits

2:00 p.m. – Bill Ruppert: Using Native Plants in a Designed Landscape Setting

  • Landscapes utilizing native plants don’t necessary need to be randomly planted, with an appearance of being “wild and weedy”.  Appropriate selection, based on a set of selection criteria, and an understanding of some basic landscape design principals can create a landscape to be envied by your neighbors.  Bill will provide an illustrated presentation highlighting 5 important plant selection criteria and examples associated with 7 landscape design considerations for creating both attractive and nature-beneficial native landscapes to keep nature near!

3:00 p.m. – Workshop ends

Special Presenting Sponsors:

Platinum Sponsor:

Contributing Sponsor:

Breakfast Sponsor:

Speaker Information:

Ed Spevak
Talk Title: Native Pollinators: Who are they? Why should we care? How can we help?
Talk Description: Discover the diversity of pollinators found in our area especially the native bees, understand their importance to us and nature and how we can help in their survival in our own front yards, backyards and fields.

Bio: Dr. Ed Spevak is currently the Curator of Invertebrates at the Saint Louis Zoo. Dr. Spevak has dedicated the last 37 years of his career to the conservation of invertebrates and vertebrates working in zoos and aquariums as a zoo curator and small population biologist. Ed is also an adjunct of the Association of Zoos and Aquariums Population Management Center, advising dozens of conservation breeding and reintroduction programs

Ed is the Director of Saint Louis Zoo’s WildCare Institute Center for Native Pollinator Conservation (CNPC), serves as the Programme Officer for the IUCN SSC Bumblebee Specialist Group, Co-Chairs the Bumble Bee Task Force of the North American Pollinator Protection Campaign and is on the Steering Committees of the Honey Bee Health Coalition, Keystone Monarch Collaborative and Missourians for Monarchs Collaborative. 

 

Bruce Schuette:
Talk Title: Midwestern Native Small Trees and Large Shrubs
Talk Description: Our native small trees and large shrubs are icons of the native landscaping movement since its beginning with Jens Jensen (prairie crabapple inspired his interest in native plants).  Learn the beauty and ecological benefits of these important components of a successful landscape.

Bio: Bruce Schuette worked for 36 years as park naturalist at Cuivre River State Park, where he provided a wide range of interpretive nature programs, natural resource monitoring, and natural resource management of the 6,400-acre park. Schuette is a long-term board member of the Missouri Native Plant Society and serves as the Missouri Prairie Foundation’s Vice President for Science & Management.

 

Dan Getman
Talk Title: Become a Citizen Scientist and Contribute to the Monarch Recovery Effort
Talk Description: Most of us would recognize the monarch butterfly, with its iconic orange and black coloring, flying alongside a road or landing on a flower to feed on nectar. But monarch numbers have declined by nearly 90% over the last 20 years and some think they should be listed as an “endangered species.”

This talk will focus on 5 simple things you can do to support the monarch’s recovery, including opportunities for each of us to become a “Citizen Scientist.” “Citizen science” is a term used for data that is collected by the general public, under guidance from experienced researchers, that is entered into a database and then analyzed by those researchers. It provides a unique opportunity to collect a large amount of data in the field.

Bio: Dan Getman is a PhD chemist who worked in research and development for the pharmaceutical industry for 30 years and is currently a consultant. He is a Master Gardener and amateur bird and butterfly photographer. He and his wife Kathy are creating habitat for birds, bees and butterflies at their home in Kirksville, Missouri. Dan is involved in a state-wide effort to create monarch habitat to support their recovery. His photos can be viewed at flickr.com/photos/dgetman/sets 

 

Claire Peckosh
Talk Title: Germination and Propagation of Native Seeds
Talk Description: Preparing seed; soil, light, and heat requirements for germination; transplanting procedures

Bio: Claire Peckosh owned Sugar Creek Nursery in Kirksville with her husband Jim from 1974 to 1989. After a second career as an instructor at Truman, she has returned to the nursery business, now focusing on native plants, perennials, cut flowers, peppers, and whatever else she finds interesting. You can find her at the Farmers Market most Saturdays or on Facebook at Claire’s Garden.     

 

John Murphy
Talk Title: Native Plants in the Landscape—on Your Acreage or Farm
Talk Description: Native plants have wide-ranging benefits for the environment, from water management and wildlife habitat, to the production of healthy soils.

Bio: John Murphy is a Private Land Conservationist for the Missouri Department of Conservation, covering Adair and Sullivan Counties, and works out of the Northeast Regional Office in Kirksville.  MDC’s Private Land Division provides technical assistance to landowners to help enhance fish, forest and wildlife conservation. 

 

 

Bill Ruppert
Talk Title: Using Native Plants in a Designed Landscape Setting
Talk Description: Landscapes utilizing native plants don’t necessary need to be randomly planted, with an appearance of being “wild and weedy”.  Appropriate selection, based on a set of selection criteria, and an understanding of some basic landscape design principals can create a landscape to be envied by your neighbors.  Bill will provide an illustrated presentation highlighting 5 important plant selection criteria and examples associated with 7 landscape design considerations for creating both attractive and nature-beneficial native landscapes to keep nature near!

Bio: William (Bill) Ruppert received his B.S. in Agriculture with an emphasis in ornamental horticulture and landscape design from the University of Missouri‐Columbia in 1980. Upon graduation, he began his horticulture career at the University coordinating the landscape redevelopment and enhancement of the University of Missouri – Columbia campus which was a significant portion of (then) Chancellor Barbara S. Uehling’s campus beautification initiative. In 1990, Bill assumed the management and ownership of the St. Louis office of National Nursery Products (NNP), a horticultural sales, marketing and consulting company representing regional and national wholesale growers of ornamental and environmental landscape plants.