MPF Featured on Front Page of 23 May 2014 Kansas City Star

PHOTO Rich Sugg, KC Star; Vast stretches of Missouri once looked like this swath of native prairie on Bonnie Teel’s land in Vernon County. She is devoted to preserving it because “soon as you turn your back on this ground, you start to lose it.” Here she finds the plant called Indian paintbrush.

PHOTO Rich Sugg, KC Star; Vast stretches of Missouri once looked like this swath of native prairie on Bonnie Teel’s land in Vernon County. She is devoted to preserving it because “soon as you turn your back on this ground, you start to lose it.” Here she finds the plant called Indian paintbrush.

Missouri prairie grass group knows it’s hard to be natural
May 22
By RICK MONTGOMERY
The Kansas City Star

RICH HILL, Mo. — Bonnie Teel inherited a landscape that many would call boring.

Hardly any shade, for one thing.

But Teel plans to spend much time and money in retirement to keep more than 600 acres of virgin tallgrass prairie just as it is. Fellow members of the Missouri Prairie Foundation will help her along.

Sometimes they come to squirt poison on young trees. They might even dab herbicide on narrow fescue blades that shouldn’t be there. They’ll kneel to gather seeds of flowering native plants and grow them elsewhere.

People who don’t know their grasses may puzzle over an irony well known by the foundation and its volunteer army of tallgrass prairie advocates: It takes a lot of work to keep a patch of ground natural.
Read more HERE.